Tag Archives: map

Map of Liofshema, Grenewic, Hacheham

Hand drawn maps of Anglo-Saxon London by the Londonist
Lovely hand drawn maps imagining Anglo-Saxon London. Blackheath included geographically, but not mentioned explicitly.

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Cave Map overlaid on Google Earth

Blackheath Caverns map overlaid on Google Earth
UPDATE: Several people pointed out that the map was oriented wrongly. I think I’ve corrected it now, but please feel free to correct it yourself (.kmz file), and send me a more accurate version! Incorrect version was here.

Here’s the map of the Blackheath Cavern from 1946 (mentioned in the previous post) overlaid onto Google Earth. I couldn’t work out how to get it into Google Maps unfortunately. Zoomed out version below (old map is in the top left corner, village is at the bottom).

Blackheath Map of Caverns from 1946 overlaid on google earth

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Pushing the boundaries…

I was wondering why Darryl had made such a long and complicated description of the electoral boundary changes – why not just upload a map? Surely the maps outlining the electoral boundaries must be held in public, and be freely distributable?

Well, not exactly. There’s this wet blanket of a site, from Ordnance Survey (friends of the Free Our Data campaign). Good luck with zooming out. And you’re not allowed to view more than one constituency at a time… But why on earth would you want to do that? Ridiculous. And who paid for the creation of these maps? You and me (and probably your great-grandparents, come to think of it).

You are also not allowed to reproduce them. Unless you’re in Sweden and have a rather more relaxed view of copyright law… Someone appears to have uploaded a map showing the old boundaries around Blackheath in blue, and the new ones in red. Unchanged bits are in purple.

http://bayimg.com/lalCKAach

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LOCOG map

A map of the proposed olympic equestrian events in Blackheath & Greenwich has been released. Just imagine the brown bits strewn with dead trees and a million muddy footprints…

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More maps of the Climate Camp

Hand Drawn Map of Climate Camp Blackheath 2009
Looking at the ad-hoc maps of the climate change camp in Blackheath is really interesting – here are some overlays of the hand-drawn maps versus the GPS trail that I made yesterday:

Here’s the hand drawn map overlaid onto Google Maps:
Clime Camp Blackheath Map 2009 overlaid on google maps

And here it is overlaid onto the GPS trail that I made yesterday:
GPS trail & Hand Drawn Map of Climate Camp Blackheath 2009

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Blackheath Climate Change Camp Google Map

Blackheath Climate Change Camp Map


Here’s a very vague map of the Climate Change Camp, complete with markers for toilets. I think the Blackboard mentioned in the previous post might be more use (or just ask anyone once you get inside).

I tried to create a proper Google Map, but it isn’t appearing on my computer for some reason. Maybe you can see it above?

I’ve also added my traces to OpenStreetMap (the Wikipedia of maps) using this very nice app. But they haven’t appeared yet, and I might have done it wrong… But the wonderful thing about these maps is that anyone can fix them – so please tidy them up!

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Memories around the Mysterious Pond

pond-old
I’ve been meaning to act on this wonderful piece sent in by Tony. I’ve just not had time… At some point I will go and take photos of all of the places he mentions:

Hi – I used to live in Blackheath (on the Lane, in Blackheath Park/Cator Estate, then Southvale Road) and although I don’t any more, I have a great fondness for the place and I love reading your blog.

I saw your comment about the Mysterious Pond – apologies if you know all this already, but if not I might be able to shed some light on it.

Living in Blackheath Park, I was always fascinated by the story of Wricklemarsh House (Neil covers it at length so I won’t give the whole story!) and used to spend time trying to track down any remnants of it.

Take a look at this map

Right slap bang in the middle, you’ve got the Grand House – and a wonderful piece of Georgian bling it was too, as these pictures will show.

It must have had great views up there at the top of the hill, although interesting it faced away from London, not towards it.

What we’re interested in are its formal gardens and especially the round pound to the north of the house. Although the house was demolished, the pond remained for many years after – hence ‘Pond Road’, and the kink in the road, as it travels round it just north of the railway bridge. The pond was drained at some point in the 20th century, not sure when, but it’s still very obvious where it was.

If you stand at the junction of the South Row and Pond Road, you’re at the entrance to the grounds of the old house, and I enjoyed standing there, picturing the grand avenue leading up the hill, with the road to the house following Pond Road up the hill, with the avenue of trees on either side. Once you’ve over the bridge, Pond Road is still a grand road, and I used to wonder if some of the ancient trees on either side might pre-date the houses and have come from that avenue.

When you reach the junction of Pond Road and Blackheath Park, you’re standing exactly where Wricklemarsh stood. Another avenue of trees would continue down what is now Foxes Dale, and another would run east-west along Blackheath Park Road itself – again, I look at the ancient trees along there, and I wonder if they were planted at the time of the grand house.

However, even more interesting is the *other* pond. Looking back at the old map, you’ll see another pond to the south, fed by a small stream called the ‘Kid’ (hence Kidbrooke). ‘Brookway’, off Foxes Dale, is another clue to its path.

Now, that pond has *mostly* been drained, but a small ornamental area of it still remains. Go east, along Brookway, to the Casterbridge estate – and there, in the middle, is a pond – a pond I’m quite confident that was part of the grounds of Wricklemarsh. Look closely at the island – you’ll see there’s a still a bit of decorative statuary remain, and there’s an ornate little bridge too (I hope, anyway, it’s been a while and my memory isn’t 100% reliable). It’s all still there on this Google map.

And what of the Wricklemarsh – well, James Cator knocked it down and developed the estate, but he did keep that wonderful collonnaded front for his own house.

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