More on the stabbing outside M&S

Blackheath Bluecoat schoolboy taken to hospital after ‘fight with gang’
Good article in the News Hopper about the stabbing yesterday. Can’t be easy being a head teacher in London.

8 Comments

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8 responses to “More on the stabbing outside M&S

  1. ElizaF

    I just don’t understand why the headmaster felt the need to apologise for an incident three hours after the end of school …. erm parental responsability anyone? If my children were involved in something outside of school hours, that would be my responsibility as far as I am concerned.

  2. Anonymous

    im a boy who goes to that school and i was there it wasn’t our foul to have the fight but if u r attacked what should you do we were only defending our selves the gang members that were all older and we had no idea why thy did and we were coming from after school events. my problem is police are there always searching us when they know we haven’t done anything wrong but and they are there because they know the gang members that attack us but where were they when this happened. their job is to protect but how come my friend was stabbed in the head even teacher they are there to protect but still this stupid gang members are able to get in school primacies and beat up one of us the teacher don’t do anything we end up fighting for our safety now please tell me is that right a 14 year old fighting a 17-22 year old for safety and for their life

    • Thanks for posting this. It’s an interesting point. Do you know which gang it was that stabbed the school kid?

      By the way, if anyone else wants to comment on this, can they stick to discussing the issue, not picking apart the grammar. I’m not posting disparaging comments.

      • Anonymous

        If you stopped posting disparaging comments, including your own, there would be little left of this blog

  3. bronte_emily@yahoo.com

    Interesting point about grammer. Reading through what the author who calls himself “a boy” wrote, it struck me that ‘he’ comes accross as someone trying to pass himself off as a 14 year old rather than an actual teenager.

    I know no teenager who refers to their school as “that school”. It is usually some local nickname or something a little more sailor-on-leave-like.

    “and i was there” Again, no specifics just a general reference to being somewhere a crime took place. It is almost if the author did not read the piece before deciding he was qualified to … make up, sorry, tell us his version of events.

    The writing pattern is not consistant. They is spelt right 5 times but then out of synch, it is spelt as “thy” once. Are is used and spelt correctly 4 times but abbriviated to the textspeak “r’ once. It is almost as if someone is trying to come over as a bad spuller. Anyone can do that, it is doing it with consistancy that is the trick. They just have to remember the words they are pretending to be a bad speller of.

    No commas, just long run on sentances but they manage to use the ‘ correctly in 2 places. Usually teenage patterns of writing get this the other way around.

    The questions posed by the author feel like sheer daily-mail-isms.
    “if u r attacked what should you do”
    “police are there always searching us when they know we haven’t done anything wrong”
    “but where were they when this happened”
    “we end up fighting for our safety”

    Also, as a ‘friend’ of the poor child who was stabbed, there is (to me) a total disregard for the victim. The piece is a general rant against police, teachers and these perpertrators of the crime, the ‘gang members’ but no comment on the condition of the victim of how seeing it impacted the author or the other boys around.

    One thing I have noticed about the Bluecoats students is an over-eagerness to tell you at the tops of their voices (even if you have no interest in the world in knowing) how they feel about everything. I have heard all the moans, groans and ranting on subjects as diverse as the ‘only 2 schoolchildren allowed in shop at a time’ signs all along their route from school to what names should be given to mates who will not share their chips. (more sailor talk)

    In fact that is a very human reaction to a trauma, the need of those surrouding the action to express their emotive reaction to the event itself. In 171 words, this “witness” never comes close.

    Why would someone bother?

  4. i went to blackheath blue coat and i can say that all this is true you were always scared to go to school and to go home there were always police at the school maybe for our safty but but no one felt safe there when there were kids in the school carring nifes the teachers i can say in my year of school were good they were there for us but the they have all gone and what is left now teenagers left to die i can stand for that school and say that its a good school in genral but no safe…..

  5. T.E.O

    I am a year 8 pupil in the school and I think my school is a very responsible school if you went to our school you would know that the stereotypical view of our school only applies to about 20% of the population of the student. If you went round you would realise we are like a small community and we do try to help out as much as we can; we also raise money for charities by doing various activities which most of us are involved in, so i don’t think people have the right to critise a school which they know so very little about and can’t everyone of us admit to the fact that every school has it bad traits. Therefore i would like people to think of my school as a place where we can commune freely with ourselves and we also have very close relationship with our teachers due to the rumors that we injure our teacher, because it does happen but once in a blue moon does it take place. Also the number of fights have decreased as our school has improved a lot.

  6. DaOne

    I saw this post and it really reminded me of how life was back in school.
    Ive recently turned 22 so its been a while since I left BBCs but as I see the experience for most is still the same. I think BBCs is one of the hardest schools to survive in for most innocent looking kids .. There have been a lot of individuals who have been either bullied by their peers or by rival school gangs(mostly Joan Roan) I started off as a hard learner in school but soon had to change to become one of the feared bullies in order to have a vicious look upon myself so i didn’t look like an easy target .. The school tried a lot to improve but due to the location of the school a lot of people from random gangs entered the school who always had trouble with other schools. I was lucky .. i managed to finish school, although i may of been one of the biggest pains in most peoples days, then i finished college and now in uni .. BBCs taught me to be tough.

    So for all those people out there who are blaming teachers and public services need to understand that the only thing that can improve that school is selective admission to school. Keep the “ghetto hoods” out and the kids who want to learn in.. Its hard but must be done.

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