Monthly Archives: March 2011

Beggars Bush

Neil wrote to me, as he’s in the process of setting up a website dedicated to the place name and literary phrase Beggars Bush. He noticed that there is a “Beggars Bush” listed on a map of Blackheath from 1695 by Samuel Travers, and wondered if anyone knew the origin of the name? It isn’t indexed as a place name in Neil Rhind’s Volumes 1 or 2 of Blackheath Village and Environs.

There is a terrible online interface to the map mentioned in the post, at the National Maritime Museum. It is completely beyond me as to why a museum would insist on only providing tiny piecemeal chunks of a map like this. They say the map is copyright, but given that it was created in 1695, and published in 1812, I can’t help thinking it should really be in the public hands (even if the mechanical copyright to the photograph is owned by the museum). It’s not as though bandwidth for delivering large images is unaffordable.

Interestingly, the delivery mechanism is very simple:

For example, this link:
http://www.nmm.ac.uk/servlet/ThumbnailServlet?src=%2FLargeImages%2FF04%2FF0460%2FF0460%5F1%5F7%5F19%2Ejpg&width=400

Delivers a single square of the map.

Increasing the numbers 5F7 and %5F19 within the URL above, adjusts the Y and X coordinates shown, respectively. Which makes me think that any web developers with a spare Sunday afternoon could probably pull down the entire map, tile it together, and then upload it somewhere out of harms way…

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Filed under blackheath, history, maps

It’s complicated

Far better version of the UK census from local blogger Diamond Geezer.

I don’t want to fill in the census. Does anyone actually know of a person who has actually been fined for not filling it in?

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Filed under blackheath

Blackheath Library hurtling towards Tripoli

It’s a great quote, and highly appropriate for Blackheath. It also chimes very nicely with the quote from pinefox’s blog shown below. Pretty much sums up almost everything I feel about living in London. So go and march on Saturday.

When libraries, pools, parks close, when civil servants are fired, we are told it’s unavoidable; there’s no more money; books must be balanced, debts paid. It sounds grimly plausible. But then a military scenario appears out of the blue, unpredicted, unexpected, a contingency not part of our plans and budgets. Not a contingency that we urgently need to respond to, like a German invasion force or asteroid heading for St Albans. No real threat is posed to British people or territory. The distance from London to Tripoli is, wait for it, 1,448 miles – a distance greater than the length of the UK or France. But here all the hard-headed economic calculation, supposedly uncircumventable, is shelved. The cold-eyed realists become sentimentally expansive. Infinite riches are promised to keep military jets in the air.

Cheaper Than Bombs

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Filed under blackheath, politics

Post-Secular Society?

The Parish of the Ascension, Blackheath, has started weekly study groups using TV show Rev as a starting point for discussions ranging from the church’s approach to social issues and its involvement in education, to loss of faith.

…He added: “We will be using Rev to explore what it means to be liberal Christians in a post-secular society…

Blackheath church swaps committee meetings for BBC sitcom Rev.

Oh really? Did I miss the moment when society was totally secular?
I quite enjoyed Rev until I read this article in the News Hopper.

UPDATE: Here’s some viewing to reset your palette. Because it’s a great piece of TV, and much better than Rev.

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The SuperMoon over Blackheath

Supermoon over Blackheath, taken by twitter user howierayner
Lovely photo of last night’s massive moon hovering over Blackheath, taken by twitter user @howierayner. Great explanation of the Lunar Perigee here.

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Filed under astronomy, blackheath

onBlackheath meeting: Bad Tempered Bongo Drums

Below are a tonne of interesting tweets from yesterday’s onBlackheath meeting (which I couldn’t attend). Mostly from BitOClass and Darryl1974 who write the SE13zure and 853blog blogs respectively.

I wish I’d managed to get there, looks like it was an interesting night. Regardless of your opinion on whether the festival should go ahead, I think it’s worth pointing out a few aspects of sound perception:

Sound pressure levels decay over an inverse square law with distance. So if you are very near to the source of a sound, and move a few metres away, the sound gets dramatically quieter. However, if you are a hundred metres away, and move another few metres back, the level barely changes. Another point to make is that decibel readings are fairly pointless as way of describing irritation from unwanted sound. For example, a continuous sine tone or burglar alarm can be very irritating even if it is at a low level, whilst a spread spectrum of pink noise at an equivalent total energy level might be barely noticeable. Music is in the ear of the beholder, so sits somewhere between the two. Finally, anyone who thinks that erecting a few soft temporary walls in the free field will make any difference frequencies below about 1kHz should really think again.

Tweets are below in chronological order. Don’t miss the bit about bongo drums.
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Filed under blackheath, festival

Crossfields – great blog

Don’t know how I missed this one. It’s great. Especially the video

We need more people like her in the world! (March on the 26th)

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Filed under Not Blackheath but nearby