Beggars Bush

Neil wrote to me, as he’s in the process of setting up a website dedicated to the place name and literary phrase Beggars Bush. He noticed that there is a “Beggars Bush” listed on a map of Blackheath from 1695 by Samuel Travers, and wondered if anyone knew the origin of the name? It isn’t indexed as a place name in Neil Rhind’s Volumes 1 or 2 of Blackheath Village and Environs.

There is a terrible online interface to the map mentioned in the post, at the National Maritime Museum. It is completely beyond me as to why a museum would insist on only providing tiny piecemeal chunks of a map like this. They say the map is copyright, but given that it was created in 1695, and published in 1812, I can’t help thinking it should really be in the public hands (even if the mechanical copyright to the photograph is owned by the museum). It’s not as though bandwidth for delivering large images is unaffordable.

Interestingly, the delivery mechanism is very simple:

For example, this link:
http://www.nmm.ac.uk/servlet/ThumbnailServlet?src=%2FLargeImages%2FF04%2FF0460%2FF0460%5F1%5F7%5F19%2Ejpg&width=400

Delivers a single square of the map.

Increasing the numbers 5F7 and %5F19 within the URL above, adjusts the Y and X coordinates shown, respectively. Which makes me think that any web developers with a spare Sunday afternoon could probably pull down the entire map, tile it together, and then upload it somewhere out of harms way…

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Filed under blackheath, history, maps

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