Gated in Blackheath

Here’s an interview with Blake Morrison (he of the library read-in the other day):
http://theguide.greatbritishlife.co.uk/article/the-great-divide-6501/

It was spotted by Kidbrooke Kite, who focused on the issue of gates around the Cator Estate, including some photos:

http://www.kidbrookekite.co.uk/2011/02/cator-estate-becoming-gated-estate.html

The full interview also mentions many great things about living in Blackheath, not just the gates. I’m not a fan of the gates… Maybe it could be renamed the Cator Compound?

6 Comments

Filed under blackheath

6 responses to “Gated in Blackheath

  1. Michele O'Brien

    Through-traffic can blight the lives of the people forced to endure it and any area that possesses the means to rid itself of it is fortunate. If residents of the Cator Estate are able to banish it from their area I say good luck to them.

    And here’s a suggestion for liberating the centre of Blackheath Village from its through-traffic at a stroke – demolish the road bridge spanning the railway tracks and replace it with a pedestrians-and-bikes-only footbridge.

    Just for once why don’t we put people before cars? Blackheath could be a lovely place without the filthy, noisy, dangerous mass of metal, rubber,
    plastic, oil and fuel that streams through it morning, noon and night seven days a week.

    • Heart of the village resident

      Well, I think that’s a lovely idea – not at all “ridiculous” – because it would prevent through traffic but not access. Access for residents, businesses and visitors would be from either the North or South sides. That is, access for those needing access to the village South of the bridge would approach from the South (Lee) side ; those needing access to the North side of the bridge would approach from the North (heath) side. There would I think be some marginal increase in traffic from the North side which would be more than compensated for by the decrease in through traffic. The only problem would be access for buses. However, that’s not a problem for me because I hate buses. Perhaps they could be rerouted through the Cator Estate? A less disruptive but almost equally effective solution might be to keep the existing bridge but narrow it to a single lane to be used only by buses, taxis and bikes with a camera to detect and penalise those who break the access rules (and thereby raise money to finance the council’s deficit). Well done Michele.

  2. Olly Knight

    What a ridiculous comment. I’d support anything that limits or re-directs HGV traffic through the village or makes the place more pedestrian friendly, but making it completely inaccessible to all traffic is stupid.

    How would emergency services get through? How would businesses receive and make deliveries? How would people who lived in the village and had room to park their vehicles get to their own homes? How would tourists who chose to drive visit and spend money in our lovely village?

    The village economy wouldn’t survive without the access to the roads and the public transport that used the roads which people rely on wouldn’t be able to serve the community.

    It would lovely without all the traffic but it would soon turn into a typical village where there is nothing but houses and one local shop for local people with very little stock because it all has to be brought in by the local farmer’s horse.

  3. woollymoomin

    If you don’t like traffic, don’t live on a road. The security folk outside the Cator Estate are cluttering up MY road now…

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