Monthly Archives: October 2010

Blackheath Library – Age Exchange Proposal

From the library meeting last week, it seems likely that the library will move into Age Exchange. It will cost £500,000 and take 18 months. Looks like a done deal:

Blackheath library proposed closure – Age Exchange proposal PDF file – (will try and convert to text when I can).

There’s more inside the resource centre at Age Exchange.

UPDATE: Full text below:

Continue reading

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Meeting tomorrow to Save Blackheath Library

Save Blackheath Library
Lewisham Council are planning to close Blackheath Library.

The final meeting that they are holding takes place tomorrow (Wednesday) evening at 7.30pm, in Blackheath Halls. This is a far easier location for people who actually use the library, so please, if you care at all about the library being shut, please come along.

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Lost – one favourite jacket

Lost coat!
I don’t usually do lost and found, but it’s definitely hyperlocal, so here goes:

Serena writes:

Whilst visiting Blackheath Halls yesterday, my 2 year-old daughter’s favourite coat became lost :-( It was her favourite, an 18-24 Month Old TU Lola Coat, it was lost between the Blackheath Halls and the road in which we parked (I think called Lee Park, it was a tree lined residential road)…as I am not local I wondered if you have any idea how I could go about finding the coat?

Anyway, photo is above – if anyone’s seen it, contact me and I’ll pass on the message.

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Lift being installed at Blackheath station

Blackheath Station Conversion
Blackheath Society reports that Network Rail will (finally – see this post in May 2008!) begin work on installing a lift inside Blackheath Station. There will be a temporary footbridge, the ramp to platform 2 will be modified, and other essential work. Lets hope they move the oyster-readers away from the exit at platform 2, avoiding the bottle-neck for season ticket holders at rush hour – really bad design decision!

They say the farmer’s market will continue as normal, but in a slightly different position in the car park.

There’s more on it here.

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That explains the racket last night

India Jane and the Burglar Alarm
Signed stuck to the front of India Jane this morning, threatening to report them to Greenwich Noise Pollution. Somehow I didn’t mind as much when I could walk in there and pick up Existenz.

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Giraffe in Blackheath (not camels this time)


Any excuse to re-use this picture. The Italian restaurant next to Pizza Express, il Bertorelli, is being closed, and a Giraffe restaurant is appearing in its place. I don’t actually ever remember visiting this place – not for any good reason, but it simply never seemed to be the right time. I guess Pizza Express was better for pizzas, and Buenos Aires Cafe is (much much) better for pasta (and anything else for that matter).

Giraffe in Blackheath

The photo above is from Giraffe’s twitter account. They also have a PR firm who are doling out free dinners on the opening night, to anyone who fancies it.

I’ve been to a Giraffe restaurant once, on the South Bank. I hope the one in Blackheath is a better experience. I guess there won’t be as many tourists, and perhaps fewer screaming children (although Blackheath’s Pizza Express always seems to manage to have a few screamers).

My overriding sense of Giraffe on the South Bank was “World Music and Burgers”, in other words, middle-class fast food. It’s disingenuous. It looks all fresh and healthy, but it’s really about burger-shovelling. And if you want a great article about the rise of middle-class fast food, I urge you to read this (he’s talking about GBK, not Giraffe it should be pointed out):

Even though a posh cheeseburger contains roughly 805 calories, compared with 490 calories in a Big Mac, there’s no shame attached to the public enguzzlement of Gourmet Burgers, partly because of the emphasis on fresh ingredients, but mainly because it’s a thoroughly middle-class form of indulgence… So, then. It seems the key to nurturing a successful chain of fast-food restaurants in modern Britain is to provide a less reprehensible version of something popular … while still enabling your customers to indulge in potentially ruinous gluttony.

Ultimately, we’re just swapping one large chain of restaurants for another, but with a slightly higher calorie count.

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